A great topic and one that needs to be further pursued. The issue of "person-machine" interface has been relevant since the first axe heads and flint cutting tools were made. The question for the first few hundred thousand years was "How can I make this tool easier to produce and easier to use?" Hammers haven't changed much over those hundred thousand years except that they are a bit easier to hold.

The last few thousand years have seen an added question: "How can this tool be made so it does more of what I want it to do?" Giant hammers run by steam, internal combustion, and electricity pound out thousands of metal parts each minute.

Now we can place sensors on the hammers so that the hammer can tell us when it's about to wear out.

In effect, the hammer becomes something of a partner in the work. I'd rather think of "better and more intensive partnerships" when thinking about our relationships with machines rather than "they'll get smart enough to replace us."

Born and raised in the South, living in Ohio. Writes about politics, management, and religion.

Born and raised in the South, living in Ohio. Writes about politics, management, and religion.