This article has a lot to say about how motivation approaches in organizations are developed and why they so often fail. Some commenters below have attributed the results to bad programming. My guess is the programming was just fine but the programmers made some wrong assumptions about what would "motivate" the wolves. Similar wrong assumptions are made by managers every day and their "algorithms" get the same results. Except, in those cases, it's not the crappy algorithms that are blamed, it's the "wolves" that the managers were trying to motivate. It's hard to imagine a programmer saying, "We rewarded the wolves for catching sheep and rewarded them for doing it quickly but those stupid, lazy, ungrateful wolves didn't catch sheep like we wanted them to." But managers say just this sort of thing all the time.

--

--

--

Born and raised in the South, living in Ohio. Writes about politics, management, and religion.

Love podcasts or audiobooks? Learn on the go with our new app.

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store
George Bohan

George Bohan

Born and raised in the South, living in Ohio. Writes about politics, management, and religion.

More from Medium

Introducing Frequency by Solsten:  The marketing intelligence platform that knows ahead.

How Learning German is like Card Counting

Thoughts on Leveraging Information Governance Process Flows for Multi-Site Program Evaluation

JOHN HARTE. A PLANET ON THE VERGE OF DEATH